Tag Archive for politics

In But Not Of The [Collapsing] World

Last year I wrote a short post on Hilaire Belloc’s Third Phase.  Belloc foresaw an upcoming fork in the road for civilization, in which “the Catholic direction will be generally restored, or it will be lost – and with it, probably our civilization.”  Rob Dreher writes rather convincingly here that we have already passed the fork, and have taken, not surprisingly, the path to destruction.  I encourage you to read his entire article, but if you are pressed, here are a few noteworthy snippets. “If by ‘Christianity we mean the philosophical and cultural framework setting the broad terms for engagement

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An Unfortunate Anniversary

Today marks the 42nd anniversary of the infamous Supreme Court decision of Roe v. Wade.  Today, hundreds of thousands will gather in Washington D.C. and pass by the White House and Supreme Court building.  Today, this annual event will once again be ignored by virtually all popular media and be viewed as an annoyance by the multitude of residents in the Capitol. In 1973,by a 7-2 margin, the Supreme Court overturned State restrictions on abortion, although allowing for implied restrictions during the latter part of pregnancy, loosely linked to the terms “woman’s health” and “fetal viability.” In subsequent years, even

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Junto Pep Talk: Moscow, Where the Shadows Lie

This is kind of a cheap post, in that I have very little insight to offer, other than I read these to articles back to back and was struck by the idea that, as Legolas put it in the film version of the Lord of the Rings: “Something stirs in the East…a sleepless malice.” From the New York Times: 3 Presidents and a Riddle Named Putin From The Imaginative Conservative: Stand, Men of the West! I especially liked the Eliot quote and the paragraph that follows it. Hope you enjoy it, too.

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Men Will Be Men? A Landmark Act In Ramsey

In my younger days, I used to be the sort of guy who would insist that I’d rather have a world that included pornography, obscenity, and the like, than live in a world of restricted expression. It sounded almost noble: I may disagree with what you’re saying, but I’ll fight to the death for your right to say it. In those days I also fell prey to the temptations of online pornography. People were free to “express themselves” directly into my computer, and I listened to the destructive siren song. My struggles to clean up my own act helped me to

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Caesar’s New ‘Census’

The emerging story out of Washington, about the government’s warrantless gathering and mining of data about American citizens, has me thinking hard about my presence on social media, the content of my emails, the terms of my searches, and the nature of my cell-phone calls. Will I be flagged in some way, because my views are Catholic or because I spend a fair amount of time scouring the web for a particular firearm (or any available ammunition)? On bad days, I weigh seriously whether I should pull the plug and go completely off the grid (not practical, given my work

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Electoral Martyrdom and the End of an Era in ‘Bachmann Country’

Earlier today, Congresswoman Michele Bachmann has announced she will not seek a fifth term representing Minnesota’s Sixth Congressional District. Her nearly nine-minute video announcement cuts to the chase early — four terms is long enough — but then she goes on to insist that the current investigations have nothing to do with her decision and to assure her constituents that she would’ve won her fifth term and that she will keep “working 100-hour weeks” on their behalf. From my perspective, it’s a classic Bachmann message, ripe with references to the Constitution, innocent life, traditional marriage, and family values; vocal in

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A National Monologue

This past week, Leon Suprenant of the Archdiocese of Kansas City shared a blog post earlier this week addressing the story of NBA player Jason Collins coming out publicly as homosexual. Most striking to me in Suprenant’s “top 10” list of reactions to the announcement and subsequent media coverage was this one: (3) National Conversation? Many news outlets talk a good game about the “national conversation” that Jason Collins’ announcement has produced, as if now we can finally have a free exchange of ideas and viewpoints on this subject. So, in the midst of such a discussion on ESPN, pro basketball commentator

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The Right Side of Eternity

Today same-sex marriage becomes the law of the land in Minnesota. Over the past few months, in particular, I’ve heard a number of people try to shame opponents of this legislation by comparing it to overturning Jim Crow laws and other important civil rights actions of the past. They say that those of us who believe marriage is a real and particular thing that cannot be redefined will wake on morning forty years from now to find we were on “the wrong side of history.” Archbishop Cordileone of San Francisco shared a different take with USA Today earlier this year

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Ceding Ground Is Not Leadership

On Thursday, the Minnesota House passed the homosexual marriage bill, one that turned out to be bipartisan thanks in part to the actions of Rep. David Fitzsimmons of Albertville, who inexplicably offered an amendment to add the word “civil” in front of the word “marriage” throughout the original bill. His stated reason for doing so was to provide future protection for churches who might refuse to perform marriage ceremonies for homosexual couples.  On Friday’s Davis and Emmer radio program, Fitzsimmons argued that the bill was going to pass no matter what and therefore he might as well make it better. davis__emmer_510_-_8am_0_1368181889 (skip to

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