Archive for Timshel

Quid Est Veritas? Cardinal Kasper’s
Troubling Foundations

On Tuesday, the Catholic World Report posted a paper by Prof. Thomas Heinrich Stark of the Benedict XVI Institute of Philosophy and Theology in Austria, entitled “German Idealism and Cardinal Kasper’s Theological Project.” It is a lengthy read, and reminded me of everything I disliked about the philosophy classes I took in college and my brief forays into academic writing. But I understood enough to be alarmed. Using one of Kasper’s early theological works, Prof. Stark shows the philosophical foundations that appear to have brought the cardinal to the point positions he currently holds on questions of morality, marriage, sexuality, and the sacraments. I

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‘We Need a New Boniface’

Yesterday was the Feast of St. Boniface, patron of the German people. The St. Paul Street Evangelization Facebook page published this photo of the great bishop and missionary whose statue graces our Sanctuary, as well as the excerpt below, taken from his writings: Let us stand fast in what is right, and prepare our souls for trial. Let us wait upon God’s strengthening aid and say to him: “O Lord, you have been our refuge in all generations.” Let us trust in him who has placed this burden upon us. What we ourselves cannot bear let us bear with the

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UN + Catholic = Un-Catholic

Yesterday, First Things published this report on Argentine bishop and Vatican official Monsignor Marcelo Sánchez Sorondo’s response to criticism about giving two well-known abortion proponents, United Nations senior advisor Jeffery Sachs and United Nations secretary general Ban Ki-Moon, a platform at a Vatican Conference on Climate Change. While I am sympathetic with the view of one of the comments below the article that we must be willing to listen to people with views different from our own, it is troubling that: High-profile population control advocates whose positions are clearly and consistently contrary to, and often critical of, the Church’s would be

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Come and Get Me

Scholar and author Brad Birzer has been sharing articles, links, and material this week on Sen. Rand Paul’s relatively lonely (it appears) opposition to the renewal of the so-called Patriot Act. Because I share Birzer’s affection for many things, including our Catholic faith, J.R.R. Tolkien, Russell Kirk, and the idea (at least) of this country, I tend to take notice of the things he is focused on, even when I am otherwise ignoring the news. This morning he shared this video from C-SPAN: … as well as this brief opinion piece from the New York Times on the necessity of Sen. Paul’s stand

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Our Missing Rib, Part 4: Belated Mother’s Day Edition

Blogger’s Note: This is the fourth in an irregular series of posts on the differences between the genders in order to spread peace and understanding. Mother’s Day was last weekend. In honor of those life-givers whose love and labor sustain our presence in this tilted world and civilize us savages, I thought I’d share two items: The first is this post from our Catholic comrades-in-arms, Those Catholic Gentlemen, entitled “What You Owe Your Wife.” I’ve run across a number of articles lately slamming Christianity, the “patriarchy,” traditional families (why “families” need such a qualifier is beyond me), and men in general for

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Overcoming Unbelief

I ran across an interesting article this week, entitled “Why Atheists Change Their Minds: 8 Common Factors.” Based on our past discussions and personal experiences, we might have come up with several of these factors. More compelling are the quotes from well-spoken and intelligent atheists who have converted, and why. My personal favorite: C.S. Lewis on reading Chesteron and others and their impact on his faith: “A young man who wishes to remain a sound Atheist cannot be too careful of his reading.” My only quibble with this post is the reference to Lee Strobel’s The Case For Christ. While

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Is All ‘Inequality’ Created Equal?

Over the last several weeks, I’ve seen a 2009 opinion piece by former President Jimmy Carter resurface on social media — apparently it went viral over Easter this year. Entitled “Losing my religion for equality,” it offers Mr. Carter’s rationale for breaking off his longtime relationship with the Southern Baptist Convention on the grounds that the group’s leadership “quoting a few carefully selected Bible verses and claiming that Eve was created second to Adam and was responsible for original sin, ordained that women must be ‘subservient’ to their husbands and prohibited from serving as deacons, pastors or chaplains in the military service.” As

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The Third Way Regarding Same-Sex Attraction

Some time ago, a friend recommended I check out the video below as a possible tool for reaching out to Catholics who have a hard time understanding, accepting, or living the Church’s teachings on same-sex attraction. I am embarrassed to say it has been many months, but it was again brought to my attention this week. The film, entitled The Third Way: Homosexuality and the Catholic Church, is a little less than 40 minutes long and includes personal testimonies of Catholics who have struggled with same-sex attraction, both outside of the Church and its teachings and now, answering the call

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Our Missing Rib, Part 3

Blogger’s Note: This is the third in an irregular series of posts on the differences between the genders in order to spread peace and understanding. This video has made the rounds of social media before, but two things drew my attention to it this time: I realized the speaker, Mark Gungor, is a Protestant pastor, marriage speaker, and broadcaster — from one of those one-name churches that seem to be springing up all over. Interestingly, I assumed he was a comedian. A number of local wives of people we know are sharing this, saying it’s spot on — which tells

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Can We Have It Both Ways?

The Christ Pantocrator from St. Catherine’s Monastery on the Sinai Peninsula provides an unusual, somewhat disconcerting, vision of Jesus, with each half of his face portraying a very different expression. Some have suggested this portrayal is meant to underscore his divine and human aspects, while others characterize his visage as combining God’s justice and mercy. A number of events and issues, both in the wide world and my own life, have me thinking more deeply about the role of, and balance between, justice and mercy in our Catholic faith. Over the years, different priests have guided me back to Church and the Catholic

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