Tag Archive for politics

Only One Way Out

I had at least four ideas for posts this week, but only energy enough for this one. We live in a country on a downward spiral. The two front-runners in our current presidential race are, I fear, bad people. Not bad like they have bad ideas or  I don’t agree with them — though both of those things are true. Bad as in not good. As a country, we have enough experience and history with the Clintons to guess the sort of people they are: power-hungry, elitist, vindictive, and predatory. And the Donald makes no attempt to hide what he is: opportunistic, unprincipled, selfish, and

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Still Time to Write Good Things On the Sky

During a long road trip this past week, I had the opportunity to listen to an audiobook version of The Wise Men Know What Wicked Things Are Written on the Sky, a volume of eleven lectures by Russell Kirk, sponsored by the Heritage Foundation and given delivered in the 1980s. The theme of the lectures was whether, on the heels of President Reagan’s election, our country was conceivably at the beginning of an “augustan age” which would see us reclaim the ideals and virtues of our forefathers and our sense of mission in this world. These lectures were a followup to an earlier series

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The Dignity of the Office

In keeping with our theme of dignity: one of the things that bothered me most in the aftermath of the recent Supreme Court decision regarding marriage was the image of the White House adorned in rainbow colors in celebration of a decision that will, like Roe V. Wade, deeply divide our country. (See the image below, and the social media icon above…for what it’s worth, our president  apparently felt this was “pretty cool.”) This is a bit of a cop-out post — but since we’re celebrating Independence Day with family and since, in a brief article entitled “Rainbow White House,” First

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Come and Get Me

Scholar and author Brad Birzer has been sharing articles, links, and material this week on Sen. Rand Paul’s relatively lonely (it appears) opposition to the renewal of the so-called Patriot Act. Because I share Birzer’s affection for many things, including our Catholic faith, J.R.R. Tolkien, Russell Kirk, and the idea (at least) of this country, I tend to take notice of the things he is focused on, even when I am otherwise ignoring the news. This morning he shared this video from C-SPAN: … as well as this brief opinion piece from the New York Times on the necessity of Sen. Paul’s stand

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Is All ‘Inequality’ Created Equal?

Over the last several weeks, I’ve seen a 2009 opinion piece by former President Jimmy Carter resurface on social media — apparently it went viral over Easter this year. Entitled “Losing my religion for equality,” it offers Mr. Carter’s rationale for breaking off his longtime relationship with the Southern Baptist Convention on the grounds that the group’s leadership “quoting a few carefully selected Bible verses and claiming that Eve was created second to Adam and was responsible for original sin, ordained that women must be ‘subservient’ to their husbands and prohibited from serving as deacons, pastors or chaplains in the military service.” As

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‘An Immortal Contract’
— and a Challenge?

Now a conservative is a person who sees human society as an immortal contract between God and man, and between the generations that are dead, and the generation that is living now, and the generations which are yet to be born. — Russell Kirk, 1957 The quote above is taken from a post entitled “No Conservatism Without a Religious Foundation” on The Imaginative Conservative (TIC) website. The post itself is an excerpt, but stands neatly as its own essay or column, reminding us that, “A society which denies religious truth lacks faith, charity, justice and any sanction for its acts.”

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Get Out the Vote or Get the Vote Out?

President Obama made waves once again this week by stating, at a Cleveland town hall meeting, that it would probably be beneficial for America to adopt mandatory voting.  “It would be transformative if everybody voted,” the president opined as he listed the people who don’t typically turn out to vote (most of whom, if they did, would fall into the Democrats’ rank-and-file).  It doesn’t take a genius to realize that our president is valuing tactics in this suggestion more than political philosophy, which has spawned a rather strong rebuke from conservative pundits.  Liberals, sharing the president’s penchant for voting, have hesitated

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Looks Like Someone Forgot Repentance…

On Friday, TIME magazine continued its love affair with our Holy Father with a brief web post entitled “Pope Francis Has Taught the Catholic Church to Thrive Again.” The writer attributes this assertion to three characteristics of Pope Francis’s leadership: he leads with mercy, authentic joy, and humility. As a result, the writer asserts, “Pope Francis has made it cool to be Christian again. His pontificate is allowing the world to rediscover the great contribution of faith to culture and civic society.” This seems to be a popular perspective these days. It also ignores that Jesus led with repentance and told us multiple

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Where Will Make Our Stand?

Last week, the most compelling thing I read was a letter from besieged Washington state florist Baronelle Stutzman, quoted in full by First Things in a post called “Stand with Baronelle Stutzman.” Stutzman refused to provide flowers for a longtime customer’s same-sex wedding, and is now facing the potential loss of her livelihood and home to a discrimination lawsuit filed by the Washington attorney general. The letter is worth reading. Stutzman clearly and courageously refuses an offer to settle the lawsuit: Washington’s constitution guarantees us “freedom of conscience in all matters of religious sentiment.” I cannot sell that precious freedom.

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Euromaidan vs Eurasianism

As the Ukraine marks the one year anniversary of the pro-Europe protests which ousted then president and Kremlin-ally Viktor Yanukovych they will commemorate the ‘Heavenly Hundred’ – the men and women who lost their lives in “Euromaidan.” Named for the Maidan, Kiev’s main square, where more than 50 people were shot and the bulk of the protests took place. The total killed during police clashes is estimated between 110 and 123. As a result Ukraine elected a pro-European government and president, Petro Poroshenko and made constitutional changes. Unfortunately, this did not solve the country’s problems but lead to confrontation with

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