Tag Archive for integrity

Spurious Language

While reading Timshell’s recent post Words Have Meaning, it reminded me of an article I came across in the National Catholic Register regarding the specious terminology used in conjunction with stem cells. They focused on the recent stories of two sports heroes who were used to grab headlines. The first was legendary hockey player Gordie Howe who apparently made a remarkable recovery from a stroke after receiving a stem cell treatment in Tijuana, Mexico. The media initially reported that “only adult stem cells were used in the injections”. However, a tenacious sports reporter, Brent Schrotenboer, from USA Today, revealed that

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Wherein Lies Love of Family?

He who loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; and he who loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me…. (Mt 10:37) If I say to the wicked, “You shall surely die,” and you give them no warning, or speak to warn the wicked from their wicked way, in order to save their life, those wicked persons shall die for their iniquity; but their blood I will require at your hand.  (Ez 3:18) I speak from limited personal experience, but it seems that few Catholics take these teachings seriously.  Last year, when my Catholic niece got married in a civil ceremony on a

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The Dignity of Dust: Humility and the Value of Inequality

“I am a deeply superficial person.” – Andy Warhol In an era of Instagram and Twitter, image and sound bites, our society is increasingly obsessed with the superficial. And although the experts will tell you that we are more aware than ever that we are being manipulated, mere awareness is not enough. If we recognize the excrement around us but continue to wallow, we are pigs, not men, and the stench becomes more intimately ours. In fact, not only are we collectively obsessed with the superficial, but we consistently overreact to it in the most absurd and conflicting ways. Consider

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Principles and Practicalities: A Dilemma

As I sat stuck in stop-and-go traffic the other morning, I found myself pining for commuter rail: a relatively uneventful and predictable commute spent reading or writing (or occasionally — let’s be honest – napping), less wear-and-tear on my vehicle and nerves, and a ready reason to leave work on time in order to catch the last train out. I have ridden the train before and loved it. In fact, I’m a big fan of the concept of rail transportation. The reality of it, however, gives me pause. I had heard when I rode the train before that it couldn’t

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Happy 237th America (Thanks to George Washington!)

Earlier today the Egyptian military leader General Abdul Fattah al-Sisi announced that his country’s first democratically-elected leader, President Mohammed Morsi, was being ousted and the new constitution suspended until (ironically) a new election could be arranged.  Unrest and violence had escalated in the last week, until the Army finally stepped in to finish off the floundering Muslim Brotherhood leadership.  But Morsi himself was the benefactor of the so-called “Arab Spring” movement of 2011, in which the autocrat Hosni Mubarak was overthrown.  And the beat goes on… The Egyptian de facto military coup is in sharp contrast to the American electoral system, in which we enjoy

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Integrity In Sport

I’m no cricket fan, but I heard this story on the radio this evening: apparently a player in international competition pretended to have made a catch and moved quickly into celebrating with his teammates. When officials discovered he didn’t have control, he was suspended for two matches (roughly 1/4 of the competition) and fined 100 percent of his earnings. He was expected to admit his failure and act “in the spirit of the game” — and not doing so cost him and his team. By contrast, Stephen Carter opens his book Integrity with this anecdote about the rise of cheating

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