Tag Archive for economics

Innovation + Abortion = Stagnation

I recently attended a week long technical symposium which, normally, I find myself too busy to take the time to indulge. However, I realized that I had managed to let a decade slip by without connecting with peers outside of my immediate circle. So this year, I decided to reconnect and get inspired. In addition to an impressive forum of technical presentations the symposium hosted a rather large trade show. By about mid-week, I had had my fill of technical papers and so decided to stretch my legs and spend the rest of the day walking the show floor. This

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Abortionomics: Shibboleth of Death

In a recent CSPAN “After Words” interview, criminologist Dr. Barry Latzer discussed his book, The Rise and Fall of Violent Crime in America, in which he examines trends between the 1960s and 1990s.  Dr. Latzer was asked about two theories regarding the drop in violent crime starting in 1994:  removal of lead from gasoline starting in the mid-70s, and the federal legalization of abortion in the infamous Roe v Wade decision in 1973. The latter theory, offered by John Donohue and Steven Levitt in the May 2001 edition of The Quarterly Journal of Economics, purports to show that children who were

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The Economic Consequences of the Peace: Quick Book Report

Moved by insane delusion and reckless self-regard, the German people overturned the foundations on which we all lived and built. But the spokesmen of the French and British peoples have run the risk of completing the ruin, which Germany began, by a Peace which, if it is carried into effect, must impair yet further, when it might have restored, the delicate, complicated organization, already shaken and broken by war, through which alone the European peoples can employ themselves and live.  The Economic Consequences of the Peace, John Maynard Keynes, 1919   John Maynard Keynes, the British economist to whom one

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Is All ‘Inequality’ Created Equal?

Over the last several weeks, I’ve seen a 2009 opinion piece by former President Jimmy Carter resurface on social media — apparently it went viral over Easter this year. Entitled “Losing my religion for equality,” it offers Mr. Carter’s rationale for breaking off his longtime relationship with the Southern Baptist Convention on the grounds that the group’s leadership “quoting a few carefully selected Bible verses and claiming that Eve was created second to Adam and was responsible for original sin, ordained that women must be ‘subservient’ to their husbands and prohibited from serving as deacons, pastors or chaplains in the military service.” As

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Reflections on Race in America: A Catholic’s Perspective Part 2

So what do I believe is happening to black America?  In order of causality and importance:   FAMILY LIFE I am inclined to think that the systematic dismantling of the black family in America is the single most important factor in the relative stagnation of aggregate black living standards.  This is certainly not an original thesis, but there is merit in learning the underlying data in order to defend the position. According to CDC, the out-of-wedlock birth rates in 1964 for white and black children were 7 % and 25 %, respectively; currently those rates are 29 % and 72 %,

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Reflections on Race in America: A Catholic’s Perspective Part 1

On the heels of the spectacle in Ferguson, Missouri I’ve tried reconciling my feelings about what’s really going on there and across the nation in regard to race relations.  Despite the undeniable improvement in opportunity for minorities in the U.S. in the last 50 years, I continue to strongly suspect a Faustian bargain of sorts in this so-called “progress.” My own experience tells me things have changed in these last several decades, and probably why I am driven to better understand what is happening in our nation, to the black demographic.  I grew up in a nearly all-black community and was the

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The Church as Economist?

With many years of experience in business, I’ve long recognized the complexity of economic issues and the difficulty in grasping how all the moving pieces interact and generate outcomes.  That is why I’ve always had a knee-jerk negative reaction whenever anyone in the Church pronounces on something economic, since even economists frankly can’t agree on their own “science.”  For a slightly different perspective, read this article, triggered by Pope Francis’ new apostolic exhortation. We Shouldn’t Turn to the Church for Economic Analysis | The American Catholic.

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