Archive for Hythloday

Friday is Coming

I want to say something to those living in the thick of the struggle: stay strong, fight the good fight, make sure you wash your hands frequently, and don’t lose hope – Friday, like Jesus, is coming.  

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Apocalyptic and Utopian

To believe it impossible for the Pope to speak infallibly, under the right circumstances, is a great error.  Yet I think an even greater error lies in granting the Pope infallibly in all circumstances.  To preserve the correct understanding of a concept, over- or misapplication must be avoided.  Inferred perpetual papal infallibility is a danger that stalks the most devout. Fr. James Schall is my favorite author of essays.  I am a fan of his style and clear and organized thought.  Fr. Schall is also a member of the Society of Jesus, a Jesuit.  On July 24, 2015, he wrote a piece that I highly

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“Summoning The Demon”

Artificial intelligence is a very hot topic.  Books, movies, major search engines …  it seems to be everywhere.  Artificial Intelligence, or AI, can be divided in to weak AI and strong AI. Weak AI is employed to make systems more “intelligent” by making them more efficient at processing information.  Its focus is narrow, and application broad. Most, if not all, of the attention in popular culture is directed at strong AI.  And while weak AI is common, strong AI is non-existent.  Strong AI would require a processor to be as intelligent as a human, and may bring with it a form of consciousness.  It’s

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With Clarity, Force, and Love

There has been a lot of attention given (for obvious reasons) to Latin America the last few years.  Though the Church once thrived to the south, as of late She has begun to lose her popularity.  Attention should be given to Latin America, and an attempt to fan the flames of faith should be made.  But, I do not think we should be looking south for the future of the Faith.  Well, at lease not due south. I stumbled across the following video excerpt from the Q&A session with Francis Cardinal Arinze at the 2007 Totus Tuus Conference (full video here – highly recommend).  When I

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“We’re Living in a Changing World”

A few days ago, Fr. Jonathan Morris was invited onto the Fox News television show, Fox & friends to discuss the possibility for people (county clerks in this case) to find protection as conscientious objectors when being required to provide marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Sigh …  I’ve hear this line of reasoning applied to many difficult topics.  The question of whether or not courts would accept conscientious objectors to gay marriage is a question worthy of discussion  Yet what troubled me, was Father’s apparent questioning of whether it was even necessary to object.  While his line of reasoning on this topic and the

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The Sack of Democracy

I was in Washington DC last summer when the SCOTUS announced its decision to strike down the HHS mandate for closely held corporations with religious objections in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc.  It was a very exciting and historic day outside the United States Supreme Court Building. Last Friday, about one year later, providence placed me once again at the United States Supreme Court Building for the announcement of the SCOTUS decision on the Obergefell v. Hodges case.  A day no less historic, though far less exciting. Each day included a minority waiting and hoping for the court to

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A Narrowing of the Option

The preferential option for the poor and vulnerable, is a principle of Catholic social teaching.  On their website the USCCB says the following of this principle: A basic moral test is how our most vulnerable members are faring. In a society marred by deepening divisions between rich and poor, our tradition recalls the story of the Last Judgment (Mt 25:31-46) and instructs us to put the needs of the poor and vulnerable first. Though incomplete, and so incorrect, this principle is often shortened to the preferential option for the poor.  It’s the often excluded “and vulnerable” clause which has allowed the principle

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Summa Theologiae Refresh

I couldn’t make any judgment on the Summa, except to say this: I read it for about twenty minutes every night before I go to bed. If my mother were to come in during this process and say, ‘Turn off that light. It’s late,’ I with a lifted finger and broad bland beatific expression, would reply, ‘On the contrary, I answer that the light, being eternal and limitless, cannot be turned off. Shut your eyes,’ or some such thing. ― Flannery O’Connor, The Habit of Being: Letters of Flannery O’Connor Though most ignorant and unworthy, I consider myself a Thomist

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Scientific Conclusions in Search of Data

It seems more and more common to find “scientists” more than willing to exchange their integrity for funding and/or fame.  Hardly a month goes by without reading a headline making a ground-breaking, yet unsubstantiated claim often from an anthropologist, Mars researcher, or particle physicist.  I don’t mean to call into question the validity of any valid scientific field or imply some are not worthy of scientific attention, just that their “scientists” seem to tolerate wild, wreck less, and unfounded claims with little blow-back from the wider scientific community.  I’m sure the editors of these articles are also to blame, but

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The Story of American Freedom

Once again we are headed toward the USCCB’s Fortnight for Freedom.  I in no way intend to belittle any effort put forth by people I have much respect for, or come across as being an enemy of religious liberty or its importance, but what exactly do we expect the Fortnight for Freedom to actually accomplish?  Is it a movement?  An organized action?  A prayer service?  It has always struck me as something too eclectic and scattered to support a clear plan of action.  Apart from the prayers and fasting good men and women offer for the cause, unfortunately I fail to see it accomplishing anything

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